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Out of the Past: Fine potatoes being grown in the county

Published on October 17, 2017 2:58PM

A fitting photo out of the Chieftain archives for hunting season. This rather unusual setup was an eye-catcher. The vehicle appears to be a 50s vehicle, model unknown. If anyone has info on this photo and the identification of the two children, please send to editor@wallowa.com.

A fitting photo out of the Chieftain archives for hunting season. This rather unusual setup was an eye-catcher. The vehicle appears to be a 50s vehicle, model unknown. If anyone has info on this photo and the identification of the two children, please send to editor@wallowa.com.

Buy this photo

100 YEARS AGO

Oct. 18, 1917

As E. A. Crossley and family were driving along the county road past Frank Heskett’s home, their auto overturned seriously injuring Mrs. Crossler. Mr. Crossler had a close call and the children escaped unhurt thanks to an usual set of circumstances.

George O. Dowling has raised some more unusually fine potatoes on his farm, known as the Ira Bloom place in Leap, adjoining the old R. E. Heskett Ranch. He has taken samples to his friends of the White Delavan variety, the largest of which weighed 2.5 pounds. The potatoes are a dry farm produce since there is no irrigation on the land.

Effective Nov. 2, the postage rate on an ounce of first-class material will rise to three cents, according to postmaster Ben Weathers. The cost for drop letters mailed for delivery from the office at which it is posted -– has risen to two cents per ounce.

70 YEARS AGO

Oct. 16, 1947

President Truman’s program to persuade the American people to voluntarily give up meat on Tuesdays and poultry and eggs on Thursdays is meeting with no noticeable response in Wallowa County. All restaurants and hotels are continuing to serve meat, poultry and eggs on these days and the meat markets report no decline in sales.

The new scoreboard on the EHS athletic field donated by the Lions Club has recently been completed and will be used at the next game when Union plays the Savages on Oct. 24.

The first private cars crossed over the new Enterprise-Lewiston highway yesterday afternoon opening this much-heralded highway to general traffic. Enterprise Mayor M. J. Rutherford led the procession. Improved road essentially ends at the bridge over the Grand Ronde.

50 YEARS AGO

Oct. 19, 1967

Idaho Power Co. announced that Hells Canyon Dam on the Snake River will begin producing electricity from North America’s deepest gorge Nov. 5 during a public open house at the huge project. The initial phase of the project will pump 425,000 kilowatts into the areas electrical grid. Two more generating units are to be added by spring 1968 for a total of 1.1 million kilowatts.

How many people does a gunny sack full of cans represent? Mike Sasser, the Bear-Sleds district Eagle Cap Wilderness guard, said he and his crew picked their hundredth sack of cans left by visitors to the wilderness area last week.

Seven candidates have been chosen for homecoming queen at Joseph High School: Sharon Kellerman, Sandra Buckley, Nancy Brights, Teri Nelson, Sue Macedo, Jane Anderson and Pat Long. Joseph will play Elgin Oct. 27 in the homecoming football game.

25 YEARS AGO

Oct. 15, 1992

A proposed study of the 1.4 million acres of land in and around Hells Canyon was soundly defeated in the U.S. House. A spokesman for Rep. Bob Smith said it was a back-handed attempt to study Hells Canyon as a national park,, something Smith opposes.

Randy and Mark Adams, formerly of Medford, are the new owners of Eagle Cap Supply in Enterprise. The brothers are planning a complete facelift for the business, which will be renamed Adams Eagle Cap Home Center.

RY Timber, operators of the Joseph sawmill, has donated an Apple computer to Joseph High School. The computer will be used for publications, keyboard instruction and for drug and alcohol prevention information.



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